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International Journal of
Hospitality and Tourism
An International, Biannual,
Double Blind Peer Reviewed
Journal
ISSN: 2240-5371
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Issue: V4N1

Paper Type: DOUBLE BLIND REFFERED PAPER

Paper Title: Philosophical texts on travels: chronicles and testimonies of travelers

Authors: Korstanje Maximiliano

Abstract:
Historically, journeys were taken by social sciences as real testimonies of other times, other customs and cultures, which gradually were constructing an object of research. Being there was not only the stepping stone of Science, but its most valid method. Colonialism and science, in many perspectives, ran together strengthening the economic and symbolic dependence of peripheries respecting to a centre. Travels were for much long time documents to consult for expanding scientific research. Social science, in fact paid considerable attention to travel chronicles, until the appearance of American sociology, Dean Maccannell in particular. Unlike the sociology of tourism in Germany, Americans believed that history has no value to infer all encompassing views. For these sociologists, empirism which was enrooted in the present, should replace to British and German sociology. From this moment on, tourism was considered a superfluous activity based on hedonism and depersonalization. This essay review is aimed at discussing not only the limitation of American sociology but also the potential founding parents of social science sees in travels. As always, Americans has serious problems to understand or single out theories originated abroad. Tourist and travellers in general are actors who transmit a political code, which merits to be deciphered by social scientist. Societies may be understood by the lens of their tourists