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International Journal of
Hospitality and Tourism
An International, Biannual,
Double Blind Peer Reviewed
Journal
ISSN: 2240-5371
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Issue: V2N2

Paper Type: DOUBLE BLIND REFFERED PAPER

Paper Title: Liberalization Syndrome in Transmuting the Casual Sites into Captivating Destinations, India.

Authors: Teja B. Bhargava

Abstract:
The rural and social geography of India has a unique character by virtue of its natural and cultural resources. Despite several invasions and foreign rulers who crafted their ethos and edifices onto this land, it remained undisturbed and verdant, and retained its native ethnicity. However, the ‘liberalization syndrome’ at the turn of the new millennium has had a profound effect in shaping a new economically vibrant India with incoming foreign investments, new infrastructure and increasing per capita income – all resulting in changing life styles, working patterns and family structures. These enigmatic changes, while phenomenally altering the socio-economic parameters by ushering in nouveau lifestyles and cross-cultural have also observed to have a significant impact in redefining the traditional role of Indian women with metamorphosed relations. The dispersions in the family structures are metaphorically demonstrated through the development of a social prism that is giving rise to various personality types and traits corresponding to different economic strata.
The relations between historical perspectives, demographic and literacy levels, and the different sectors of the economy with their supporting infrastructures are now being investigated. Studies have located the factors that have led to a transmutation of destinations in the wake of the ‘liberalization syndrome’. The data is also being analyzed and interpreted vis-ŕ-vis declining conjugal relationships with increasing incomes. These studies necessitated the author in reclassifying Burton four-phase classification to encompass three sector economies by including agriculture and service sectors in addition to industrial sector. These findings go on to show that a phenomenal rise in the income levels is the main cause attributable to the changing lifestyle and dispersion in the family structures in traditional Indian families consequent to the opening up of the economies. These studies further revealed that dwindling relationships led to a search for new attractions and services that resulted in a transmutation of casual destinations into captivating tourism attractions.