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International Journal of
Hospitality and Tourism
An International, Biannual,
Double Blind Peer Reviewed
Journal
ISSN: 2240-5371
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Issue: V3N2

Paper Type: DOUBLE BLIND REFFERED PAPER

Paper Title: Events and Tourism: The role of (Imagineering) Events in Local Community self-actualisation in small territories. The case of Haiti

Authors: Hugues Seraphin, Nolan Emma

Abstract:
Events are fast becoming a developing industry and their contribution towards the economy has been verified. Small islands developing states (SIDS) like Haiti (once the "Pearl of the Caribbean" is now one of the poorest countries in the world) would benefit from its generating effects. For the moment, events taking place in Haiti are mainly designed and organised by the DMO to fulfil three particular roles: improve the image of the destination, attract visitors and in some extent, create a kind of community cohesion. Many academic papers have been written about the Haitian economic situation. One of the latest is the paper written by Junia Barreau (2012) entitled: "FDI: The difficult situation of Haiti". However, any academic paper has been written about event programmes as a potential way to sustain cultural and sporting activities in Haiti. This article aims to contribute to the body of meta-literature in this area by answering the following question: How can event programmes in Haiti be imagineered to maximise outputs for the local community?
Our article unfolds in four steps. First, we diagnose the disadvantages SIDS usually faces. Second, we analyse some of the key societal features of Haiti. Third, the paper builds on academic critical literature on Event (particularly Imagineering Events) to highlights areas of good practice and areas that need to be improved by the DMO in Haiti. Forth, we discuss the impacts of those (Imagineering) Events on the performance of the destination. We also aim in this paper to find out if (Imagineering) Events in Haiti can be adequate replacement to attractions and be a boost for the tourism industry.